First Impressions – Windows 10

With Microsoft’s latest operating system mere hours from being launched to the general public (midnight launch tonight), there has been much anticipation surrounding Windows 10 and whether or not Microsoft can right the wrongs that Windows 8 committed. Needless to say Microsoft have promised a number of great things which they are adamant Windows 10 will be able to deliver.  Perhaps the biggest change is that Windows 10 will be “the last operating system ever” as the business model of the OS has now shifted to being offered as a service.  What does that mean for us? By being offered as a service, Windows 10 will be part of a continuous improvement process as the OS is continuously upgraded and tweaked via mandatory system updates (more on that in a bit).

Pressing on, I have managed to obtain Windows 10 Pro Edition (x64 of course) and decided to format my Win 8.1 installation in order to put the new OS to the test.  Bearing in mind that this article is merely my first impression upon successfully installing the OS and there will most likely be a follow-up article where I take a much closer look at what’s on offer.

The familiar system information screen, almost identical to Windows 8 and still devoid of the Windows Experience Index.

The familiar system information screen, almost identical to Windows 8 and still devoid of the Windows Experience Index.

So perhaps the most important aspect of installing a new OS (at least for me) is its ability to maintain compatibility with existing hardware and software – will I be able to install all my favourite games and applications successfully?

Starting at the top, I installed my Asus motherboard drivers (via driver disk) followed by AMD’s Catalyst 15.7 GPU package – both installed quickly without error.  Secondly, I attempted to install Driver Navigator (extremely useful app) however the software would not install due to a compatibility issue.  ACDSee Pro 8, Java 8, Adobe Flash, VLC Player, CCCP, Office 2013, Winrar, Witcher 3, Dragon Age Inquisition, CCleaner, Firefox, VeraCrypt, Rocketdock and Inkscape 0.48.5 all installed successfully – tested working. Because I found Windows Defender to be a little too enthusiastic (where cracked games are concerned), I installed AVG Internet Security 2015 which rectified the problem.

As expected, UAC makes a return and as usual it's the first thing I disable.

As expected, UAC makes a return and as usual it’s the first thing I disable.

Next, I wanted to test Apple & Android devices, I installed the latest version of iTunes and connected my iPod – detected, tested working.  Plugging in Android devices proved to be painless as well as both my Samsung S4 and Lenovo IdeaTab A3000 connected and were accessible without errors.

As Driver Navigator wasn't an option, I attempted to update several drivers via device manager, working surprisingly well (for a change).

As Driver Navigator wasn’t an option, I attempted to update several drivers via device manager, working surprisingly well (for a change).

As previously stated, I experienced no issues installing the 15.7 Catalyst Suite – omitting the components I didn’t want (AMD HD Audio driver) and that’s where Windows decided to “help out”. At this point I decided to run the update service to see how it works, sure enough, there were a number of security updates as well as the AMD Audio driver I had omitted installing from the Catalyst Suite.  Annoyingly, there was no way to stop this, however Windows does allow you to uninstall problematic drivers.

This aggressive mandatory update policy for Windows will undoubtedly change sooner or later especially since KB3073930 has already been released.  These mandatory updates have already proven to be problematic for Nvidia GPU owner’s as the auto-updates conflict with Nvidia’s own GeForce Experience application – an issue that will undoubtedly be addressed shortly.

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The KB3073930 update allows you to stifle/alter the mandatory updates to a degree.

Needless to say, as promised, Windows 10 comes with DirectX 12, which is also backwards compatible with a lot of DX11 cards such as my AMD R9280 OC GPU – great news!  Microsoft’s proprietary apps work as well as expected, such as Photos, and the updated Music application which I am quite fond of – upgraded from Windows 8.  I have yet to test Cortana as there were a myriad of updates for it and as Microsoft so proudly stated, Edge is fast, really fast but it will unlikely replace Firefox as my browser of choice anytime soon.

The sought-after DirectX 12 - an integral part of Windows 10.

The sought-after DirectX 12 – an integral part of Windows 10.

In closing, Windows 10 has made a good first impression with me, unlike the horrific ordeal I had with Vista back in 2006 (an unmitigated disaster).  I will continue to test and unearth what Windows 10 has to offer and if they manage to resolve this whole mandatory update fiasco they will earn further brownie points with users undoubtedly.  My opinion on all these “reasons not to upgrade to Windows 10” articles that are floating around? Ignore them.  The minimal requirements are negligible where the modern PC user is concerned and even older PC’s will run it quite comfortably.  Microsoft have learned their lesson since Windows 8 and I look forward to seeing how Windows 10 evolves in the coming months.

[Update – 2015-07-29:] I installed the latest version of Driver Navigator (version 3.6), installed successfully – tested working.

[Update – 2015-07-29:] Cortana Would not run due to my region (South Africa) not being supported.

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